N.E. Chapter of the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators is on exhibit at the state art gallery

Atrium Gallery at One Capitol Hill features 3 RI artists

An educational art exhibit by the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators, New England Chapter, called Rivers to the Sea, is currently on display at the Atrium Gallery at One Capitol Hill on the main floor of the state’s Administration Building in Providence.

Artwork by three Rhode Island artists, Albert Pointe, Riverside; Melissa Guillet, Johnston; and Frances Topping, Charlestown, are featured in the show. Pointe has three illustrations, and they are of Dobsonfly Nymph, Stonefly and Alderfly larvae; Moose; and Moon Jellyfish. Guillet’s is a Zebra Clubtail Dragonfly, and Topping’s is a North American River Otter.

On viewing the installation at the state’s gallery, which is managed by the RI State Council on the Arts (RISCA), Randall Rosenbaum, Executive Director of the state’s arts agency, said, “We are proud to present this work by an organization that blends arts education with natural science. The display provides a range of scientific illustrations, and we are grateful to the Guild for sharing with Rhode Island 13 of its members’ works. I hope Rhode Islanders make a point to visit this exhibition in our state’s gallery space.”

The artists are:

  • Melissa Guillet, Johnston, R.I.
  • Albert Pointe, Riverside, R.I.
  • Frances Topping, Charlestown, R.I.
  • Carol Schwartz, Manchester, Conn.
  • Jeanette Compton, Hamden, Conn.
  • Dorie Petrochko, Oxford, Conn.
  • Patricia Cassady, Middleborough, Mass.
  • Wendy Chadbourne, Chapter president, Lakeville, Mass.
  • Sau-Mei Leung, Clinton, Mass.
  • Mark Lefkowitz, Sharon, Mass.
  • Nancy Minnigerode, Marstons Mills, Mass.
  • Peggy Rambach, Andover, Mass.
  • Nanci Worthington, Southfield, Mass.

The Guild’s N.E. Chapter was founded in 1999 to provide encouragement for scientific illustrators through networking, technique workshops and public education. The members represent a wide range of fields including natural science, scientific, botanical, medical and veterinary illustration. They are art educators, freelance illustrators, staff illustrators, backyard scientists and students who paint, sketch, sculpt or work digitally.  Read more about the Guild, click here.

Exhibit details

What: Rivers to the Sea by the Guild of Natural Science
When: Open to the public, weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., through Jan. 7.
Where: The Atrium Gallery, first floor of the state administration building, One Capitol Hill, Providence    

The Atrium Gallery at One Capitol Hill was developed to exhibit the work of Rhode Island artists in the State Capitol Complex. It hosts exhibits on a rotating basis, in partnership with several state agencies & organizations. The art gallery enhances Capitol Hill as a destination point for visitors, as well as for the many people who visit Administration offices or attend conferences at One Capitol Hill. It also enriches the work environment for the hundreds of state workers who spend their workday in the building. For more information, click here.

The Rhode Island State Council on the Arts is a state agency supported by appropriations from the Rhode Island General Assembly and grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency. RISCA provides grants, technical assistance and staff support to arts organizations and artists, schools, community centers, social service organizations and local governments to bring the arts into the lives of Rhode Islanders. To learn more visit http://www.arts.ri.gov.

Statement from the Guild of National Science Illustrators

When man first started to colonize the world, one major determinant to where we established our communities was the presence of and access to water. If you look at any modern maps, you can’t help but notice that our major cities are in close proximity to water. This phenomenon is very much the same with the natural world. If you take a hike anywhere here in New England, you will find an abundance of biodiversity near sources of water.

The land is divided by rivers, streams and creeks, each with their own watershed. A watershed is a land area that drains and channels precipitation back to the sea in a constant cycle. Each of these watersheds are unique – supporting a vast array of ecological systems. These ecological systems support a wide variety of biodiversity which changes as you travel from the upland headwaters of a river all the way to the termination into the sea.

All this biodiversity relies on the precious resource of clean water flowing past without obstructions. The watersheds provide critical life support to the animals and plants living in them, including drinking water, migration routes, nurseries, and irrigation for native plants which provide sources of food and shelter as well as prevent erosion of the land. It is a complex and interconnected web of communities upon which the actions of man can have serious and long-lasting impacts.

The members of the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators New England Chapter are celebrating the biodiversity of watersheds in their chosen media, to help bring awareness to the fragile communities which rely on healthy watersheds all through New England. No matter how far you physically live from a body of water, you are having an impact on the watershed that drains into that body of water. The overall health of these fragile communities, and ultimately our own, relies on healthy watershed systems.

Atrium Gallery at One Capitol Hill traveling exhibit celebrate first juried Native American artist exhibit

Warwick Center for the Arts, Tomaquag Museum and RISCA’s Atrium Gallery Traveling Exhibits joined forces for a new exhibit of Native American artists called Resilience. The show will be on display at the Warwick Center for the Arts 0n Post Road, from July 31 to Sept. 4.

The exhibit was curated by Angel Beth Smith. Exhibiting artists are Lisa Aquino, Nkéke Waupianoohom Harris, Sherenté Harris, Nayana LaFond, Silvermoon LaRose, Heebe Tee Lee, Julia Marden, Lynsea Montanari, Deborah Spears Moorehead, Canden Robinson, Angel Beth Smith, Lorén Spears, Robin Spears, Weeko Thompson, Brooke Waldron and Toni Weeden.

The State Native American Art Exhibit at the Atrium Gallery at One Capitol Hill has been celebrated since 2012, and holds the distinction of being the first regional and state art exhibit for Native American art. The exhibition features work from the Native community that represents a traditional and contemporary approach to Native American art in a variety of media. The mission of the Native American Art Exhibit is to sustain the culture of the Eastern Woodland Indigenous People, and allow every story to be told and heard. Their traditions, both old and new, evoke a story of cultural preservation.

The initiation of the Atrium Gallery Traveling Exhibits, in partnership with Warwick Art Museum, Attleboro Art Museum, and the Courthouse Center for the Arts, has grown to include the Newport Art Museum. These exhibits, through travel, highlight the work of diverse artists, and gain attention when visiting other Rhode Island and New England cities. 

Click here to learn more about the exhibit in Warwick.

Artwork by Rebecca Flores is on exhibit at the state art gallery

An exhibition of artwork by Cranston-based painter Rebecca Flores called Nature, Nurture, Hope is currently on display at the Atrium Gallery on the main floor of the state’s Administration Building, One Capitol Hill, Providence. The exhibit, which closes on Sept 17, also features art works by Flores’ son Joshua Elijah Amado.

On viewing the installation at the state’s gallery, which is managed by the RI State Council on the Arts (RISCA), Randall Rosenbaum, Executive Director of the state’s arts agency, said, “We are proud to present this work by artist Rebecca Flores and her son in the Atrium Gallery at One Capitol Hill. The art is strong, but it also helps us understand and address these difficult and highly emotional times. I hope Rhode Islanders make a point to visit this exhibition in our state’s gallery space.”

About the exhibit, Flores said: Nature, Nurture, Hope: A different kind of mental health was created by me in 2013, at my home studio in Cranston, in an effort to precipitate behavior that generates a dysfunctional amount of emotion and approach, as well as encourage a deeper understanding of learning some mental and emotional self-defense that can be very empowering. This can offer the mental and emotional fitness to allow people to function at levels they want to and are capable of. The exhibition includes contents and makeup that is part of the formula for feelings that is simply easy to learn tools that are important and should be employed in our daily lives. Tools that teach our young people and adults that things do go wrong in our life, that no matter what happens we should control our thoughts that affect our environment, the benefits of health, understand how it protects us, and to what extent we should get involved.”

Artist Statement: Painting is my key to the secret of my spirit, my way of freedom, my communication feeling torn between two cultures. The images I create are a therapeutic process of artmaking revealing stories of spiritual truth with the movement of how my life has manifested into what I truly believe in as a second-generation Puerto Rican born in New York City. Change can exist through the arts in any shape or form. My art has helped me convey acceptance and acculturate the willing to raise awareness using methods creative to the eye that spells out and articulates in detail how the world is being Nuyorican; what is taking place and how we as a society still need further evidence of expression through the world of art genres in order to notice the significance of trust, hope, and belief. A balance surrounding my two worlds while being a Puertorriqueña.

Rebecca Flores has been a painter since the age of 10, and has achieved one of her childhood dreams of owning and operating her own gallery, located in Onset, Mass. Art lovers of all genres have long been collecting her works in the United States and throughout Puerto Rico. In 2014, during a juried exhibition at the Newport Art Museum, she won First Prize/Best Painting entitled Romancing, part of her Mental Health collection – Nature, Nurture, Hope: A different kind of mental health. Currently, Rebecca has a master’s degree in psychology and a certificate of Advanced Graduate Studies (CAGS) in expressive arts from Salve Regina University. She mentors high school students and works with women and underprivileged youth as a Therapeutic Artist and Poet in hopes of improving and enhancing their physical, emotional, social and psychological awareness. She is surrounding herself with knowledge and wisdom in the area of her culture on Puerto Rican literature.

After tragically losing her 18-year-old daughter Natasha Love Gonsalves in 2008 through a senseless act of teen violence, she decided to forge ahead with her passion, and her mission to inspire and empower her audience by helping them realize their faith, vision, and energy to believe.

She is the creator of the word “SerLieve “– she started with the English word, “believe” and the Spanish word, “Ser.” She took the English suffix of believe, “lieve,” which means willing, and incorporated it with the Spanish word “Ser,” meaning to be, she thoughtfully developed and created the word “SerLieveTM.” In her world of inspiration, “SerLieveTM means to be willing to exist with Spiritual confidence, trust, and vitality and accept experiences meant for discovering ourselves.”

Using her aspiration to continue her inspiration, SerLieve Apparel Designs – her art on clothing was born. Flores is the Founder of The Natasha Love Foundation for non-violence, a non-profit organization established in her daughter’s memory. For more information visit: www.rebeccafloresartist.com.

Joshua Elijah Amado was born in Rhode Island in 1998. Joshua became fascinated with drawing and building at age 6. At age 13, he embarked on a journey and established his tie-dye t-shirt business (The Joosh Crew), along with creating the characters and logo. A business that promotes health and wellness, education and learning, friendship and anti-bullying. A venture he took on after his sister Natasha Love Gonsalves was taken due to an act of teen violence. Joshua is big on the art of nutrition and wellness. Presently, Joshua has begun to acknowledge his character enjoyment of life. He is applying his wisdom in painting abstracts as a pastime, a deep-rooted self-awareness experience in hopes it will take him to another level in reinventing himself making his dreams a reality. He is the ambassador for The Natasha Love Foundation-Nonviolence Through the Arts.  Joshua has been honored with numerous accolades from state officials in Rhode Island for his contribution to community service, educating and encouraging young people to strive for self-discovery fostering hope, respect for oneself, and one’s community in peaceful, healthy ways. His email is: Joshamado38th@gmail.com.

Exhibit details
What: Nature, Nurture, Hope by Rebecca Flores with works by her son, Joshua Elijah Amado
When: Open to the public, weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. through September 17.
Where: The Atrium Gallery, first floor of the state administration building, One Capitol Hill, Providence

Read more about The Atrium Gallery at One Capitol Hill.