Hera Gallery/Hera Educational Foundation seeks works that address current turmoil and transformation

Juried by Francine Weiss, Senior Curator at the Newport Art Museum
Deadline for submissions is March 1

2020 was a year that was filled with worldwide turmoil. The Pandemic. Another reckoning with racism and police brutality. Climate Change, wildfires, hurricanes and droughts. The undermining and politicization of science. The widening political divide. An election with voting rights, healthcare, immigration, paid sick leave, income inequality, living wages, reproductive rights, LGBTQIA rights, our environment and the future of democracy at stake.

Is this turmoil leading to transformation? And what kind of transformation is it going to be?

Hera Gallery/Hera Educational Foundation is looking for work that addresses the current turmoil and visions of our future. What are the emotional, physical and spiritual effects of the turmoil and how might they manifest into the transformation? What does our world look like and what might it look like post-2020. Will transformation reflect the multiplicity of voices of America? How will our future be transformed by the current chaos?

We are seeking work in all media that reflect aspects of the turmoil and how they may serve as a catalyst for transformation including utopian and dystopian visions, Afrofuturism, speculative artwork, science fiction, and other post-modern themes.

For more information and questions, email. 

Apply through this link

Selected photos of folk and traditional arts and artists in our state

The folk arts are defined as those artistic practices which are community or family based and express that community’s aesthetic heritage and tradition. The learning process is informal and is passed on from generation to generation by word of mouth, apprenticeship and imitation.

Folk Arts Apprenticeships are designed to foster the sharing of traditional (folk) artistic skills between a master and an apprentice who is already familiar with the genre. The program creates this opportunity specifically for individuals who share a common cultural heritage.

Folk Arts Fellowships provide support to individual artists who demonstrate the highest level of skill and accomplishments in their craft.

FY 21 Folk Arts Apprenticeship Grantees

Folk ArtistAmount
Lydia Perez$3,000.00
Nader Molina Figueroa$3,000.00
Debbie Spears Moorehead$3,000.00
Julie Yang$3,000.00
Carolyn Castro$3,000.00
Lesly Pineyro $3,000.00
Patricia Smith$3,000.00

FY21 Folk Arts Fellowship Grantees

Folk ArtistAmount
Assitan Coulibaly$1,000.00
Joel Rosario$5,000.00

For more information on Folk Arts Fellowships and Apprenticeships, contact Elena Calderón Patino.

RISCA to commission public art for Garrahy Judicial Complex 

The free application process is open through Feb. 15  

 The Rhode Island State Council on the Arts (RISCA) is requesting qualifications for a new public art commission for the Garrahy Judicial Complex parking garage, which is located at 1 Dorrance St., Providence. The deadline is Feb. 15, and the applications will be reviewed by a public art selection panel.  

Without belying the dignity of the court, artwork that is colorful, bright, cheerful, calming and/or soothing would be appropriate. The selection panelists indicated that applicants should consider how the artwork is viewed from both inside and outside the courthouse. The Courthouse is used by approximately 3,500 people daily and has 400 employees. 

Through a competitive selection process, one artist or team of artists will be chosen to create a large-scale temporary mural, which will be on display for 5 years. This is a national call open to all artists. Students are excluded. There is no fee to apply, and the budget has been set at $98,000.  All information and the application can be found online at by clicking HERE

The courthouse is adjacent to the Providence Innovation and Design District, which encompasses land made available during the relocation of I-195, and may change significantly because of its adjacency . Besides visitors to the courthouse, the parking garage mural will be highly visible to residents, visitors, hotel guests, and those employed in the area. The façade is visible from multiple vantage points throughout the city.  For more information, contact Faye Zuckerman.  

“Public art is a proven way to enliven a community. A blank wall is just a blank wall, but put a mural on that wall and it adds visual interest and excitement to a neighborhood or business district. We look forward to commissioning work that will contribute to the Garrahy Courthouse and its surrounding community.” 

  –Randall Rosenbaum
Executive Director, Rhode Island State Council on the Arts

About the RI Public Art Law: Artwork for the Garrahy Judicial Complex will be commissioned by RISCA through Rhode Island’s Public Art Law, which mandates that 1 percent of all state capital construction and renovation funds be allocated to the purchase and maintenance of public art. Through this program the State recognizes that “public art creates a more humane environment: one of distinction, enjoyment, and pride for all citizens.”