RISCA On the Road! A Tour of the Ocean State’s Cultural Facilities and Public Art Sites

On August 7th RISCA escorted budget analysts from the House and Senate Fiscal Staff and the State Office of Management and Budget on a tour of cultural facilities and public art sites throughout the State of Rhode Island.

This was an opportunity to provide direct “off-the-page and in-the-field” experience about state investment in cultural facilities and public art to our colleagues in the House, Senate and State Budget Office.  It was a full day of traveling to a variety of sites.

RISCA’s amazing Public Art Manager, Elizabeth Keithline, organized the day’s tour. Here’s where we went:

9:00 am – Cultural Facilities project at the Common Fence Improvement Association, 933 Anthony Road, Portsmouth

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Senator James Seveney (left) joins members of the Common Fence Point Community Center project in Portsmouth

10:00 am – Public art projects at the Veterans Home, 480 Metacom Ave, Bristol 

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Artist Allison Newsome describes her work “The Eagle Has Landed” at the Rhode Island Veterans Home in Bristol
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Artist Deborah Baronas with one of her installations at the Rhode Island Veterans Home in Bristol

11:30 am – Cultural Facilities projects at the RI Philharmonic, 667 Waterman Ave, E Providence

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Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra and Music School Executive Director David Beauchesne conducts a tour of the Carter Center for Music Education in East Providence

1:00 pm – Public art projects at RI College, 600 Mt. Pleasant Ave, Providence

Rhode-Island-College-with-work-at-Alex-and-Ani-Hall
RISCA’s Public Art Manager Elizabeth Keithline shares information on public art on the Rhode Island College campus with participants in the tour

2:30 pm – Cultural facilities projects at the Greenwich Odeum, 59 Main St, E Greenwich

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Senator Bridget Valverde (center) and her children visit the Greenwich Odeum in East Greenwich

4:00 pm – Public art projects at URI, 45 Upper College Rd, Kingston

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Visiting a large bronze sculptural work by Rhode Island artist Peter Diepenbrock in front of Lippitt Hall on the University of Rhode Island campus
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An installation at URI’s Beaupre Center for Chemical, Forensic Sciences by artist Erwin Redl
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Participants in the day-long tour included (from left to right) Timothy Donahue, House Fiscal staff; Randall Rosenbaum, RISCA Executive Director; Elizabeth Keithline, RISCA Public Art Manager; Kelly Carpenter, Senate Fiscal staff; and Loren Spears, RISCA Council Member.

2020 Fellowship Announcement

RISCA is pleased to announce the first 14 RISCA Fellows and Merit Fellows of 2020! At the April 1st cycle, we award fellowships in: Three Dimensional Art; Crafts; Fiction; Film & Video; Photography; Play & Screenwriting; and Poetry.

Fellowships are unrestricted awards that encourage the creative development of artists by enabling them to set aside time to pursue their work and achieve specific creative and career goals. One $5,000 fellowship and one $1,000 merit are awarded in each of 13 disciplines each year. Fellowship and Merit awards are based solely on artistic merit, and are highly competitive. Awards are selected through an anonymous panel review of submitted work samples. You can see some of the pieces recipients in Three Dimensional Art, Crafts, and Photography submitted here.

Three Dimensional Art
Fellowship: James Drain
Merit: Johnny Adimando

Crafts
Fellowship: Borris Bally
Merit: Jocelyn Prince

Fiction
Fellowship: Darcie Dennigan
Merit: Matthew Kramer

Film & Video
Fellowship: Luli Heintz
Merit: Jan Carlos Terrero Rodriguez (aka Slitty Wrists)

Photography
Fellowship: Mara Trachtenberg
Merit: Tina Tryforos

Play & Screenwriting
Fellowship: Lawrence Goodman
Merit: Aashish Edakadampil (aka Ash Adams)

Poetry
Fellowship: Carrie Oeding
Merit: Laura Brown-Lavoie

RI Cultural Anchor: Uriah Donnelly

UD - uriah donnellyUriah is a nonprofit administrator and arts educator from Warren, RI where in early 2016 he launched The Collaborative, a nonprofit arts organization. Uriah is also a published writer and celebrated musician. He lives in Warren with his wife, Janet. We asked him a few questions about his life and art-making in Rhode Island for our series, Rhode Island Cultural Anchors.

RISCA: Give us a brief overview of your day yesterday- what did you do in both your personal and professional life.
UD: Well, the Collaborative is one of four “jobs” that I have so each day is unique. But specifically yesterday I ran an art selection presentation for Art Connection-RI at WARM Center in Westerly, updated the website for Art Night Bristol Warren, met with the Superintendent of Bristol Warren Schools as part of my grant writing position with the Town of Warren, and then went shopping for refreshments for The Collaborative’s Student Artist of the Month Artist Reception. Later in the evening, I attended the reception (which was very well attended!)

RISCA: What do you love about the art community in Rhode Island?
UD: Simply put, it’s that there are so many folks doing great things here with creativity and drive to make the arts a permanent part of Rhode Island’s economic and cultural RISCA - uriah donnellylandscape.

RISCA: Why do you make Rhode Island your home, and how did you end up here?
UD: I’m a Rhode Islander. My family are Rhode Islanders. There’s not a way to un-become that, it’s in the blood.

RISCA: What is one thing, personal or professional, that you or your organization want to accomplish in the next year?
UD: My main goal has always been to grow The Collaborative into a sustainable organization with full time employees and year-round arts education programs. This year we were able to begin compensating our Gallery Manager with a small stipend. My hope to grow that position into full time by next year. Programming-wise, we are really working hard on adding more workshop and class opportunities for people of all ages.

RISCA: Why do you do what you do? What inspires you, drives you, to create or enable the creation of art?
Self - uriah donnellyUD: Have you ever seen the look on a young person’s face when they create something they are proud of and see it hung on a gallery wall? Or the look when someone they don’t know purchases it? The arts are so important to the community, I can’t think of anything else I’d prefer to do than support the folks creating it.

RISCA: What is one thing you think the art community in Rhode Island needs?
UD: More funding! Lots and lots of money please.

You can see what Uriah is up to at The Collaborative by visiting their website, and following them on Facebook and Instagram.