Wickford Art Association Scholarship Program Applications due February 21

March is Youth Art Month and in celebration, The Wickford Art Association (WAA) will present its annual Scholarship Fund awards to three Rhode Island public high school senior art students with a fourth award presented by the Rhode Island Art Educators Association in March.

Each Rhode Island public high school chooses one college-bound senior art student for consideration. The four winning students will receive cash scholarships in the amounts of $1,500, $1,000, $500 and with a fourth award from Rhode Island Art Education Association of $500 to use towards college. Winners also receive a one-year membership to WAA, a fine art exhibit in our gallery and exhibit space at the 57th Wickford Art Festival, ranked the #7 fine art festival in the country. This is an excellent, resume-building opportunity for college bound students. Interested students should speak with their art teachers about submitting their portfolio for consideration.

The 2019 WAA Scholarship Program application may be downloaded at http://wickfordart.org/scholarship-program-exhibit-and-awards-ceremony/ [wickfordart.org]

Application submission period ends February 21, 2019.

Rhode Island Cultural Anchor: Meredith Stern

mush6 - Meredith SternMeredith Stern is a ceramicist and printmaker living in Providence. She is a member of the international group The Justseeds Artists’ Cooperative. She is RISCA’s 2019 drawing & printmaking fellow.

We asked her a few questions about her life and art-making in Rhode Island for our series, Rhode Island Cultural Anchors.

RISCA: Give us a brief overview of your day yesterday- what did you do in both your personal and professional life.

MS: My typical work day in the winter begins by bringing wood inside for our woodstove and drinking coffee. I usually spend some time answering emails and managing other administrative issues. I’ll cook a lunch at home and then work on creating new work. Sometimes this means cutting up old prints and creating collages from them, other times it means drawing a new print onto a slab of linoleum or printing an image onto paper. I pick up our child from daycare in the afternoon and I often invite one of his friends over. Once my husband finishes work at 6, we have dinner as a family – usually cooking at home- and sometimes go on an adventure together. A walk outside, going to the playground, or when the weather is lovely, working in our backyard garden.

RISCA: How did you end up in Rhode Island?

MS: I visited Rhode Island in August of 2005 to visit some friends and we drove to the Fannie Simonowsky - Meredith Sternbeach and I fell in love with the salty air and the feel of the sand between my toes. I had been living in New Orleans for 7 years and there were no nearby places to swim in clean water. I was enthralled with the fact that we could get to the ocean in Rhode Island in less than one hour, so I decided to move in with my friends for a couple months. That visit turned into me now living her for 14 years.

RISCA: Why do you do what you do? What inspires you, drives you, to create or enable the creation of art?

MS: I am inspired by people and our need to communicate and to connect with each other. Artistic expression can allow people to connect through non-word based language which allows for subtlety, for emotions, for dreams to be shared through sound, texture, color, or touch. I think art can be many things to many people – it can communicate what is present but also who and what we can be. Art can allow us to think differently, to explore different possibilities, and to explore how our society can change and how we can be better. Much of my art explores history, social movements, family connections, and mutual aid and cooperation.

RISCA: What is one thing you think the art community in Rhode Island needs?

MS: I think our society as a whole needs to work to undo institutional inequality, specifically racism, sexism, transphobia; which means so does the arts communities. Nationally, white men have been over represented, celebrated, and rewarded in museums, galleries, etc. It’s essential that we acknowledge our historic biases, and work to correct it. This can include many efforts, including retelling art history from the perspective of those who have historically been marginalized or ignored. We can Justseeds InstallationPIttsburghBiennial2 - Meredith Sternhighlight artists and hire administrators in our museums, galleries, and other cultural centers who reflects the diversity of perspectives of people living in our city of various ethnicities and genders.  Another example is a custom that has been being adopted by cultural and educational institutions of land acknowledgements of the indigenous inhabitants of the land. I’ve seen this done in the University of Connecticut, and I’d like to see institutions in Rhode Island adopting this practice as well. There’s a lot of work to do to address systemic inequality, these are just a couple examples.

RISCA: What is the biggest challenge for you in your art life?

MF: Time. I used to spend 10 – 12 hours locked in my studio 5-6 days a week. Now we have a three-year-old and I have less time and need to budget my time better. I have less time to wander through the stacks at the library or get lost in the woods by myself. I think I am more efficient with my time, but sometimes miss the ability to lose myself in a book or random adventure for a day or two.

Get ready for April 1st! Upcoming Grant Workshops and Drop-in Hours with RISCA

Need help writing your grant for the April 1st deadline? There are number of ways the friendly RISCA staff can help you with your grant application through Grantwriting and Budget Workshops, Drop-in Hours, and more. Look here for a listing of our available grants. 

Grantwriting and Budget Workshops

If you’re new to submitting a grant application to RISCA, or just want a refresher on the “good and less good” of grant writing, join us at one of our grantwriting workshops happening around the state in February or March. This series of grantwriting workshops will have a special focus on best practices in writing budgets for grant applications.

You’ll also be able to meet and talk to some of the RISCA staff about your grant application ideas. We’ll give an overview of our major grant programs, then you’ll have time to ask questions and meet with program staff.

To attend a workshop, click on the links below to RSVP:

Providence: Monday, February 25, 10 AM – 12 PM at Department of Administration, Powers Building, One Capitol Hill, 2nd Floor, Conference Room 2-A, Providence

South Providence: Saturday, March 2 10:30 AM – 12:30 PM at Rhode Island Indian Council,
807 Broad Street, Providence

Pawtucket: Monday, March 4, 6 – 8 PM at Mixed Magic Theatre, 560 Mineral Spring Avenue, Pawtucket, RI

Wakefield: Monday, March 11: 6 – 8 PM at Contemporary Theatre Company, 327 Main Street, Wakefield, RI

One-on-One Meetings

Fellowships and Individual Artists Grants

Mollie Flanagan, Individual Artists Program Director, will be holding a variety of one on one meetings in her office and around the state for artists interested in Fellowships or Project Grants for Individual Artists. You can sign up for a 30 minute or 1 hour slot, and ask her any specific questions you have about the grant programs. She can also help you with the budget form, review any specific answers you’ve written, or anything other assistance you need with your grant or fellowship application.

To sign up for a meeting slot, click on the links below:

RISCA’s offices: Various dates and times in late February through March, at 1 Capitol Hill, 3rd Floor, Providence, RI 02908.

Tomaquaq Museum: Saturday, March 16th, 10 AM-2 PM, 390 Summitt Rd, Exeter, RI 02822.

Stadium Theatre: Tuesday, March 19th, 4-7 PM, 290 Monument Square, Woonsocket, RI 02895

Arts Access Grants and Investments in Arts and Culture Grants

Todd Trebour, Organizations Program Director, will be holding one-on-one meetings from RISCA Offices (or by phone) for non-profit organizations interested in Arts Access Grants, or arts and culture organizations who have been invited to apply for Investments in Arts and Culture. You can sign up for a 1 hour slot, and ask him any specific questions you have about the grant programs. He can also help you with the budget forms, review any specific answers you’ve written, or anything other assistance you need with your grant application. If none of the dates or times listed work for you, email Todd at todd.trebour@arts.ri.gov to schedule an alternate date/time.

RISCA’s offices: Various dates and times in between February and late March, at 1 Capitol Hill, 3rd Floor, Providence, RI 02908.

Project Grants in Education

Maggie Anderson, Director – Arts In Education, will be holding one-on-one meetings from RISCA Offices (or by phone) for non-profit organizations, artists and schools interested in Project Grants in Education. You can sign up for a 1 hour slot, and ask her any specific questions you have about the grant program. She can also help you with the budget forms, review any specific answers you’ve written, or anything other assistance you need with your grant application.

RISCA’s offices: March 25, 9 AM – 3 PM, at 1 Capitol Hill, 3rd Floor, Providence, RI 02908.

Library Drop-In Hours

Mollie Flanagan, Individual Artists Program Director, will be holding drop in assistance at two Providence Community Library locations. This is totally unstructured time, so bring a laptop and work on your grant, ask Mollie specific questions, get technical support- whatever you need to help get your grant submitted by the deadline.

To RSVP, click on the links below:

Washington Park Library: Thursday, March 21, 4-7 PM, 1316 Broad St, Providence, RI 02905

Mount Pleasant Library: Saturday, March 30, 1-5 PM, 315 Academy Avenue, Providence, RI 02908