Hera Gallery and Educational Foundation announces a National Juried open call called ‘Dough’

Juried by a food historian; deadline is August 8

Application Fee: $15- 35, visit heragallery.org for coupon codes.
Deadline: August 8, 2021
Exhibition Dates: October 16-November 13, 2021
Apply now by click here.

Hera Gallery and Educational Foundation presents the National Juried Open Call- Dough. Why is dough as a material so appealing? Is it the promise of what it could bring? How can artists use this malleable material and convey the creative ideas generated from the promise of bread, a sense of comfort, religious connotations, or patiently waiting for the pandemic sourdough from the neighbor to rise? Bread sharing and giving is a primary part of many cultures and communities. How can we express this intimate relationship in this exhibition? By sight, smell, touch?
Why is dough a slang word for money in English? Are we talking about scarcity or abundance? Is dough a metaphor for our cash-driven society that still celebrates people according to their cash value while the nation faces unprecedented food insecurity based on systemic inequality?

Dough, in its many forms, is tangible and alive. Perhaps it connects humanity to something instinctual and essential. From sourdough mania to food lines of unfathomable dimensions, dough has been on our minds for the past year. Did it make its way to your art?

What kind of an exhibition can we “bake” together?

Juror Bio: Catherine M. Piccoli is a food historian, writer, and curator whose work focuses on the intersection of food, culture, memory, and place. She brings a multidisciplinary approach to the Museum of Food and Drink as curatorial director, where she oversees the creation of exhibitions and robust public programming for adults and children. Catherine led the development of MOFAD’s major exhibitions – African/American: Making the Nation’s Table, Chow: Making the Chinese American Restaurant, and Flavor: Making It and Faking It – as well as gallery shows – Highlights from the Collection, Knights of the Raj NYC, and Feasts and Festivals. Previously, Catherine worked as a researcher at the Chicago History Museum and the Heinz History Center. She holds an M.A. in Food Studies from Chatham University and a B.S. with honors in Social and Cultural History from Carnegie Mellon University. Catherine acted as MOFAD’s interim president from March through December 2020.

For more information

New exhibition of Rhode Island artists opens at T.F. Green Airport

A new art exhibition is now on display at TF Green Airport’s GREEN SPACE Gallery, a partnership between RISCA and the RI Airport Corporation (RIAC). The gallery now features works by Rhode Island artists Pascale Lord, Barrington, Sarina Mitchel, Providence, and Jill Stauffer, Wakefield, and will be on display through Sept. 19.

“By highlighting RI artists, this gallery offers travelers coming and going to our state a vision of our incredible creativity. It’s a treat for first time visitors and residents to discover RI’s thriving and diverse arts community, a key economic driver.”

Randall Rosenbaum, RISCA’s Executive Director
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Pascale Lord

Pascale Lord, a French native, began her art career at Strasbourg University graduating with a CAPES in Arts Plastiques. She completed her master’s by working with the Strasbourg Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art. Following graduation, she continued her art through teaching and had the opportunity to organize exhibitions with regional museums. In 2005, she relocated to the United States with her family; first to Seattle where she was an active member of Gallery 110 and had several exhibitions on the West Coast, then to Rhode Island in 2011 where she is an active artist member at IMAGO Gallery in Warren. Her work is focused on individual and collective experiences morphing into memory, which in her words, “fades, degrades, erases, resurfaces, tears, and stretches, like the canvas of my paintings.” Read the artist’s statement.

Sarina Mitchel

Sarina Mitchel is an artist based in Providence. Fascinated by the intersection of science and art, her current focus is on paintings inspired by cells and biology. The paintings on display are based on microscope images of epithelial cells in human lungs, which form an essential barrier, separating one organ from another, outside from inside, our bodies from the world. Her works turn the complexity of groups of airway epithelial cells into something beautiful that will intrigue viewers. She uses iridescent inks to create a sense of depth and motion and adds a dimensional element to her paintings by etching patterns into the surfaces. Her artistic process involves hand-tracing the cell boundaries, then programming a CNC router to etch that image onto the painting surface. Mitchel says, “When airway epithelial cells cannot perform their function as a barrier, a person can become sick with respiratory diseases like emphysema or COPD. Little did I know when I started working on this series, before the pandemic upended our lives, these are the same cells COVID-19 first attacks when it reaches our lungs.” Read more about the artist.

Mitchel’s work has been shown throughout Rhode Island, and in cities such as New York, Boston, Kansas City and Golden, Colorado. She has donated artwork to benefit organizations such as AS220, the CSPH, the Attleboro Arts Museum, Visual AIDS, Operation Breakthrough and Planned Parenthood.

Jill Stauffer

Jill Stauffer is an interdisciplinary artist based in Wakefield. Her interactive installations are inspired by the coastal ecosystems and sacred spaces of the places she’s lived. The pieces serve as interactive spaces for self-reflection and the exploration of themes related to ephemerality, grief, spirituality, transformation, and the beauty and fragility of the natural world. Stauffer’s work is born out of a ritual of labor, installations which are the whole of many components, each crafted delicately in a ritual of contemplation. Her hand is visible in each piece, explicit labors of sewing, cut paper, and the application and sanding down of paint layers. Stauffer holds a BA from Middlebury College in Vermont, with majors in Studio Art and Architectural Studies. She recently completed an Artist Intern Fellowship with NE Sculpture and looks forward to an internship with Josephine Sculpture Park this summer. In addition to her art practice, Stauffer has worked in arts administration with community art and design nonprofits in Providence, Baltimore and Minneapolis. Read more about the artist.

Exhibitors for GREEN SPACE were chosen by panelists Kathy Hodge, Viera Levitt and Frank Poor.

Grant applications now available for artists, culture workers affected by the pandemic

The application deadline is June 14 at 8 p.m.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Artist-Relief-Fund-High-Res-3215478059-1613660510794-1024x438.jpgApplications for a new round of funding for arts and culture workers from the Artist Relief Fund (ARF) are now available. The deadline is June 14 at 8 p.m.

To apply for a grant, sign up through the Artist Grant Portal or visit ARF online for more information.

Since last spring, ARF has been providing small grants to RI artists and culture workers, who have experienced hardships due to the pandemic. This funding has helped members of the diverse arts and culture community to stay safe and receive assistance for living and incidental expenses.

Consider donating to the Artist Relief Fund

In addition to offering grants, the Artist Relief Fund is taking donations. The funds raised will go directly to the arts community, which continues to face significant challenges as they are in the early stages of returning to work. The arts community is asking those who can, to consider donating to the RI Artist Relief Fund for arts and culture workers. To learn more and donate, click here.

“Rhode Island’s individual artists and creatives have been disproportionately impacted by COVID-19. Income for artists essentially stopped, and artists had trouble paying rent and putting food on their table. It is vital that we continue to offer support and assistance to artists and culture workers, who have and continue to add tremendous value to our state’s economy and the creative life of our communities.”

–Randall Rosenbaum, Executive Director, RISCA