Hera Gallery/Hera Educational Foundation seeks works that address current turmoil and transformation

Juried by Francine Weiss, Senior Curator at the Newport Art Museum
Deadline for submissions is March 1

2020 was a year that was filled with worldwide turmoil. The Pandemic. Another reckoning with racism and police brutality. Climate Change, wildfires, hurricanes and droughts. The undermining and politicization of science. The widening political divide. An election with voting rights, healthcare, immigration, paid sick leave, income inequality, living wages, reproductive rights, LGBTQIA rights, our environment and the future of democracy at stake.

Is this turmoil leading to transformation? And what kind of transformation is it going to be?

Hera Gallery/Hera Educational Foundation is looking for work that addresses the current turmoil and visions of our future. What are the emotional, physical and spiritual effects of the turmoil and how might they manifest into the transformation? What does our world look like and what might it look like post-2020. Will transformation reflect the multiplicity of voices of America? How will our future be transformed by the current chaos?

We are seeking work in all media that reflect aspects of the turmoil and how they may serve as a catalyst for transformation including utopian and dystopian visions, Afrofuturism, speculative artwork, science fiction, and other post-modern themes.

For more information and questions, email. 

Apply through this link

Coronavirus and the Arts

2019-coronavirus

Everyone in Rhode Island’s arts community is, no doubt, aware of the Coronavirus disease that is spreading throughout the country and the world, and that has been reported here in the Ocean State.

We are not health professionals, but we’re very fortunate to work with a wonderful team of health professionals at the Rhode Island Department of Health. We strongly advise you to visit (frequently) their excellent webpage of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), which contains the latest information on the disease and what we here in Rhode Island can do to stop its progress.

‘As artists we have an additional obligation to protect ourselves and those who come together to see our work.  We are not at a point yet where health professionals are recommending that performances or exhibitions be cancelled – this is, indeed, happening in places around the world – but artists and organizations need to be open and transparent about the steps that they are taking to protect their audiences.  Consider, for example, including a notice on your website and a placard in your lobby or in programs similar to what Trinity Rep recently posted:

CORONAVIRUS

All performances, classes, and events at Trinity Rep are, to-date, proceeding as planned. The health, wellness, and safety of our staff, audiences, and artists are our top priority. Our team is implementing best practices and CDC recommendations, while staying in close contact with our colleagues across the country. We are monitoring the evolving coronavirus situation closely and will provide updates as needed. (Updated 3/3/2020)

Consider providing disinfecting wipes and hand sanitizer stations to your patrons, and wiping down seats after each performance.

And check out this post from the National Coalition for Arts’ Preparedness and Emergency Response about preparing for the possibility of temporary closures.

We’ll continue to monitor this situation, and communicate via newsletter and social media.  We encourage you to stay alert, and most of all, stay healthy!

Now On Exhibit at the Block Island Airport Gallery: Artist Molly Dicksinson

Image by Molly Dickinson

RISCA is pleased to present works by artist Molly Kugler Dickinson on exhibit January 6th through June 7th, 2020, at the Block Island Airport Gallery. The Block Island Airport Gallery presents the work of contemporary Rhode Island artists in quarterly exhibitions.

Dickinson’s “Fabricated Landscapes” exhibition of recent work features plein-air oil paintings that are a direct response to the moment in the “premier coup” tradition. Dickinson is interested in landscapes that reflect the impact of human activity; thus the term “fabricated” as her chosen locations are no longer in their raw, unaltered state.

The series, painted in Middletown, Maine, and Provincetown, feature landscapes where this intersection of nature and human activity is evident. Examples: the Sachuest National Wildlife Refuge, whose sweeping vistas are the result of the land having been used for grazing, a military station and a garbage dump prior to becoming a park; Pemaquid ME, where the pine forest is unnaturally uniform due to having been clear-cut then subsequently re-growing all at one time; and the Cape Cod National Seashore, whose sweeping, fascinating dunes and vistas are the result of early English settlers overgrazing the area, then planting it with African dune grass in an attempt to shore up the resulting erosion. Little of these lands has escaped the imprint of human activity.

Dickinson asks the question: do we find beauty in unaltered nature only, or have we in some measure adopted a reshaped landscape as our own, more ideal version? As she explores her question in these pieces one feels her hand, her marks remaking the land again. Fabricated Landscapes will be on view through June 7th, 2020.

Exhibitors for the Block Island Airport Gallery were selected by jurors Ana Flores, Nancy Whipple Grinnell and Angel Smith.

The Block Island Airport Gallery, a partnership between the Rhode Island Council on the Arts and the Rhode Island Airport Corporation, promotes outstanding work by artists living and working in Rhode Island. The gallery will present art to an ever-changing audience of local, national and international travelers.