New exhibition of Rhode Island artists opens at T.F. Green Airport

A new art exhibition is now on display at TF Green Airport’s GREEN SPACE Gallery, a partnership between RISCA and the RI Airport Corporation (RIAC). The gallery now features works by Rhode Island artists Pascale Lord, Barrington, Sarina Mitchel, Providence, and Jill Stauffer, Wakefield, and will be on display through Sept. 19.

“By highlighting RI artists, this gallery offers travelers coming and going to our state a vision of our incredible creativity. It’s a treat for first time visitors and residents to discover RI’s thriving and diverse arts community, a key economic driver.”

Randall Rosenbaum, RISCA’s Executive Director
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Portrait_Pascale_Lord-1024x887.jpg
Pascale Lord

Pascale Lord, a French native, began her art career at Strasbourg University graduating with a CAPES in Arts Plastiques. She completed her master’s by working with the Strasbourg Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art. Following graduation, she continued her art through teaching and had the opportunity to organize exhibitions with regional museums. In 2005, she relocated to the United States with her family; first to Seattle where she was an active member of Gallery 110 and had several exhibitions on the West Coast, then to Rhode Island in 2011 where she is an active artist member at IMAGO Gallery in Warren. Her work is focused on individual and collective experiences morphing into memory, which in her words, “fades, degrades, erases, resurfaces, tears, and stretches, like the canvas of my paintings.” Read the artist’s statement.

Sarina Mitchel

Sarina Mitchel is an artist based in Providence. Fascinated by the intersection of science and art, her current focus is on paintings inspired by cells and biology. The paintings on display are based on microscope images of epithelial cells in human lungs, which form an essential barrier, separating one organ from another, outside from inside, our bodies from the world. Her works turn the complexity of groups of airway epithelial cells into something beautiful that will intrigue viewers. She uses iridescent inks to create a sense of depth and motion and adds a dimensional element to her paintings by etching patterns into the surfaces. Her artistic process involves hand-tracing the cell boundaries, then programming a CNC router to etch that image onto the painting surface. Mitchel says, “When airway epithelial cells cannot perform their function as a barrier, a person can become sick with respiratory diseases like emphysema or COPD. Little did I know when I started working on this series, before the pandemic upended our lives, these are the same cells COVID-19 first attacks when it reaches our lungs.” Read more about the artist.

Mitchel’s work has been shown throughout Rhode Island, and in cities such as New York, Boston, Kansas City and Golden, Colorado. She has donated artwork to benefit organizations such as AS220, the CSPH, the Attleboro Arts Museum, Visual AIDS, Operation Breakthrough and Planned Parenthood.

Jill Stauffer

Jill Stauffer is an interdisciplinary artist based in Wakefield. Her interactive installations are inspired by the coastal ecosystems and sacred spaces of the places she’s lived. The pieces serve as interactive spaces for self-reflection and the exploration of themes related to ephemerality, grief, spirituality, transformation, and the beauty and fragility of the natural world. Stauffer’s work is born out of a ritual of labor, installations which are the whole of many components, each crafted delicately in a ritual of contemplation. Her hand is visible in each piece, explicit labors of sewing, cut paper, and the application and sanding down of paint layers. Stauffer holds a BA from Middlebury College in Vermont, with majors in Studio Art and Architectural Studies. She recently completed an Artist Intern Fellowship with NE Sculpture and looks forward to an internship with Josephine Sculpture Park this summer. In addition to her art practice, Stauffer has worked in arts administration with community art and design nonprofits in Providence, Baltimore and Minneapolis. Read more about the artist.

Exhibitors for GREEN SPACE were chosen by panelists Kathy Hodge, Viera Levitt and Frank Poor.

Artwork in the shape of face masks is on exhibit at the state art gallery

Face mask art celebrates creativity and protection against COVID-19

An exhibition of artwork in the shape of a face mask is now on display at the  Atrium Gallery on the main floor of the state’s Administration Building, One Capitol Hill, Providence. The Conceal/Reveal Mask Installation was created during the pandemic and presents a mix of handmade face masks by RI artists and members of the community, who answered an open call. The exhibit, which examines the intersection of the arts and healing will be open to the public, weekdays from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. through June 25.

On viewing the installation at the state’s gallery managed by the RI State Council on the Arts (RISCA), Randall Rosenbaum, executive director of the state’s arts agency, said, “I am amazed and in awe of the quality of the pieces our community contributed to this timely show, which illustrates the healing power of the arts. Conceal/Reveal sends another important message, and that is to encourage community members to do their part and wear a mask to slow the spread of COVID-19.”

The face mask art exhibit was originated and displayed at the Providence Art Club’s Dodge House Gallery on Thomas Street. It included works by Rhode Islanders of all ages and members of the Art Club. In late fall, Rhode Island’s Art and Health Network expanded the show to include works by Department of Health staff, and faculty and students from The Pennfield School, Portsmouth. In addition, the 80 masks were exhibited at the Department of Health and the RI State Archives on Broad Street in Providence.

“Creativity is available to each of us and we experience it in profound ways during times of crisis.  The COVID-19 pandemic has been no exception. It has fed the creativity of artists and individuals from across the globe,” said Steven Boudreau, co-chair, RI State Arts and Health Network. “This Conceal/Reveal exhibition has drawn upon the experience, grief, humor and resilience that many Rhode Islanders have endured since the beginning of 2020.”

Exhibit details
Conceal/Reveal Mask Installation, an exhibit of artwork in the shape of a face mask.
Open to the public, weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., through June 25.
The Atrium Gallery, first floor of the state administration building, One Capitol Hill, Providence

Read more about the following: 
Atrium Gallery at One Capitol Hill
Rhode Island Art and Health Network
Providence Art Club
RI’s handmade face mask art

 Reopening RI measures effective May 21, 2021

Venue capacities and expansion of services adjusted to pre-COVID operations

On May 20, 2021, Governor Dan McKee lifted most COVID-19 restrictions for those who are fully vaccinated. For the latest specifics, details and visit reopeningri.com.  

Link to updated K-12 health and safety guidance as of May 18, 2021.

As of May 18, 2021, Rhode Island’s  Fully_Vaccinated_Masking_FAQ.pdf.

The provided guidance is safer to adopt for fully vaccinated individuals. Establishments may (but are not required to) supplement these rules with their own rules regarding mask wearing, proof of vaccination, testing, and other mitigations. Signage guiding expectations around the following topics is recommended at establishments. As of Friday, May 21, the following adaptations, by sector, will be effective:

  • No physical distancing is required
  • Indoor Dining: No restrictions
  • Bar Areas: No restrictions. Indoor standing service allowed; no plexiglass required
  • Catered Events: No restrictions: 100% capacity with no cap; indoor and outdoor standing/bar service/cocktail hours; open dance floors
  • Houses of Worship: No restrictions
  • Retail: No restrictions
  • Gyms, Sports, Recreation: No restrictions
  • Personal Services: No restrictions
  • Venues of Assembly: No restrictions
  •  Funeral Homes: No restrictions
  • Offices: No restrictions
  • Social Gatherings: No restrictions
  • Pools: No restrictions
  • Casinos: No restrictions

Q: What is the latest mask guidelines for recreational and entertainment businesses and historical/cultural establishments?

A: Indoor and outdoor recreational or entertainment businesses and historical/cultural establishments may operate without capacity restrictions. People must remain six feet apart for indoor activities that involve singing or performances when masks are not worn, such as karaoke. This distance requirement may be reduced to three feet if masks are worn and the performance does not involve singing. Outdoor performances must allow for three feet of spacing between all people. Performance distance and mask wearing requirements may be removed if all individuals who are performing show proof that they are fully vaccinated.

Sports: Mask requirements remain in place for all youth sports, indoor and outdoor. The CDC has recommended this through the end of the school year because young people are not fully vaccinated yet. This policy will be reassessed on July 1st. Adult sports will have no restrictions and will follow CDC guidance.

In the following sectors that are considered “higher-risk,” CDC masking guidance for vaccinated individuals is especially important.

  • Live Vocal Performances: Status quo. Can move to no restrictions if vaccination proof is required.
  • Nightclubs: Remain at 50% capacity. Can move to no restrictions if vaccination proof is required.
  • Indoor Hookah: Status quo (not permitted). Permitted and can move to no capacity restrictions if vaccination proof is required.

There are three key sectors that are remaining status quo:

  • Healthcare settings
  • Congregate care settings
  • Youth and school-based events

Reiteration of Masking Recommendations

Q: Who still has to wear a mask and practice social distancing?

  • People who are not fully vaccinated. This includes children from 2 to 12 years of age. Children younger than 12 cannot be vaccinated.
  • Both vaccinated and unvaccinated people in healthcare settings. Examples of healthcare settings include doctors’ offices, home nursing facilities, hospitals, and nursing homes.
  • Both vaccinated and unvaccinated people traveling on public transportation. No capacity restrictions. Other applicable state and federal rules remain in effect.
  • Both vaccinated and unvaccinated people in facilities that serve people experiencing homelessness, including residents and employees.
  • In prisons and correctional facilities.
  • Teachers, students, school administrators, and staff should continue to wear masks while in school and in school-based settings, even if they are fully vaccinated.
  • Both vaccinated and unvaccinated employees and customers of businesses that require masks.
  •  In other states, cities, towns that have different masking rules that differ from Rhode Island’s rules.
  • Masking required for student catered events/strongly recommended for other catered events.

If you have not already done so, you can make an appointment to be vaccinated at www.vaccinateRI.org or by calling 844-930-1779.  You do not need appointments to get vaccinated at the sites at Sockanosset Cross Road (100 Sockanosset Cross Road, Cranston) and the Dunkin’ Donuts Center (1 La Salle Square, Providence). Vaccines are also available at pharmacies throughout Rhode Island.

Businesses looking for more information regarding reopening can visit, reopeningri.com. Print signage resources, reopening guideline charts, and masking guidance are available on this site.

Business owners with specific questions can visit, dbr.ri.gov or call and leave a message on the COVID-19 Hotline at 401-889-5550.

Sign up for our newsletter for the latest information.

May 20, 2021, guidelines override re-opening for the arts FAQs of April 2021

The RI Arts Council hosted a webinar on April 9, 2021, to update the arts community on the latest rules and regulations regarding re-opening for the arts this spring and summer. If you missed it, here is a link to the recording. Below are the questions and answers that were covered in the webinar.

The speakers were:
Department of Health, Steven Boudreau;
Commerce RI Benjamin Mays;
City of Providence, ProvidenceACT: Lizzie Araujo;
and Department of Business Regulation, Elizabeth Tanner.

Outdoor Events

Q: What are current restrictions on outdoor performances? Number of attendees, distancing and masks? How does the size of the space influence any and all of these factors?

A: Outdoor performances are restricted to the same capacity requirements as outdoor venues of assembly which are currently capped at 500 people. Six-foot distancing must always be maintained between people who are not from the same household and masks must always be worn.

Size of the area does not impact the capacity restrictions and 500 people is the maximum any outdoor venue of assembly can go up to. However, with the 6-foot distancing requirement, not all outdoor venues will be able to accommodate 500 people. The 6 foot-distancing requirement takes precedence over the 500-person maximum.

Q: What should we know about performers operating outdoors in front of an audience? Choral and instrumental spacing on stage? Masked or unmasked?

A: While performers are singing or playing an instrument that requires the use of their mouth, modify or adjust seating arrangements and use visual cues to keep them at least 14 feet apart when masks are not being worn.

Performers singing or playing wind instruments with masks on and using bell covers should be a minimum of six feet apart. If performers are masked and playing an instrument that does not require the use of their mouth, such as drums, guitar, violin etc., keep them six feet apart, but 14 feet apart from those who are using their mouths to play an instrument or sing without a mask. This includes specialty music performance masks such as masks with slits, or in outdoor rehearsals where appropriate physical distancing may be challenging or inconsistent, such as marching band.

Limit the sharing of props, costumes, and wigs. Designate personal props to each individual and mark with name tags. No sharing of voice projecting mechanisms such as microphones or headpieces. Even microphones and headpieces used by only one person should be disinfected after use.

Q: Do you have guidance on things like box office operations, food service (for audience and for performers, with masks off)? Organized in pods or general seating?

A: Contactless payment is encouraged. If food or drink is being served, designated areas should be created away from the general audience where patrons are able to remove their masks for eating and drinking purposes. These areas should follow the same restrictions that are placed on the restaurant sector.

Q: What are reopening guidelines for summer 2021 youth camps?

A: They are pending and should be available shortly. Subscribe to our e-newsletter where we will place updates or check back here for updates.

Indoor Events

Q: If we are in compliance with regulations, when will indoor performances be able to resume? What questions should we be considering as we start to think about in-person events once more?

A: Indoor performances can resume following the same restrictions that are placed on venues of assembly.

Q: What are current restrictions on indoor performances or art exhibits? Number of attendees, distancing, masks? How does the size of the space influence any and all of these factors?

A: In both performance venues and art exhibits, 6-foot distancing must always be maintained between people who are not from the same household. Indoor performance venues would be classified as venues of assembly.

Currently venues of assembly are restricted to 50 percent of the venues capacity and capped at 250 indoors and 500 outdoors. With the 6-foot distancing requirement, some venues may not be able to achieve the 50 percent capacity or capped thresholds.

Indoor art exhibits are restricted to one person per 50 square feet.

Q: Are there any differences among the kinds of performances? For example, youth theatre, dance, instrumental or choral music?

A: No

Ventilated/Unventilated spaces

Q: What are HVAC requirements for summer – small spaces with old air conditioning units or are poorly ventilated?

A: Individual venues should consult with the Department of Business Regulations with the specifics of their current HVAC capabilities.

Q: Will performers need to wear masks when they are off stage?

A: Yes, performers must wear masks when they are off stage.

Social distancing

Q: what are some best practices for audiences? If patrons are seated more than six feet apart, is it okay for them to remove masks?

A: No, even if the social distancing requirement is maintained at six feet, masks cannot be removed and must be worn throughout the duration of the event.

People from the same household may sit within 6 feet of one another, but those who are not from the same household must be sat at least 6 feet apart from one another.

Q: What guidelines exist for cleaning and disinfecting?

A: All covered entities shall ensure the performance of environmental cleaning of their establishments once per day, with particular attention paid to commonly touched surfaces, such as shared workstations, elevator buttons, door handles and railings. Covered entities shall use, and have readily available to service providers, cleaning/disinfecting products designed to clean/disinfect the surfaces they are cleaning/disinfecting and shall use the products in the manner intended.

Vaccinated, Tested, Infected

Q: Do you recommend testing prior to rehearsals or performances? Will proof of vaccination replace proof of a negative COVID test result?

A: The Health Department continues to recommend testing even for rehearsals and performances. Currently, proof of vaccination does not replace a negative COVID test.

Q: Are there any guidelines about distancing if all performers have been vaccinated? or if not?

A: The Executive Order currently in place mandates that six feet be maintained from people who are not from the same household regardless of vaccination status. Even those who have been vaccinated, should stay 6 feet apart from those who are not from the same household as them.

Q: If a performer, student or staff member tests positive for COVID, will the program or production need to be shut down for a period of time?

A: Depending on who is identified as a close contact of the person who has tested positive, the program or production may need to suspend operations.

Anyone who was within six feet of the positive individual for a total of 15 minutes or more, starting two days before their symptom onset or before a positive test was received, is identified as a close contact and must follow the quarantine guidelines. Current exemptions from close contact quarantine can be found in Executive Order 21-26.

Q: Can/should a venue collect written vaccination status from performers, staff, volunteers and audience members, and is this even allowable? how does one handle a non-vaccinated person?

A: We are not proposing this at this time.

If things go bad

Q: Can you share some force majeure contract language that specifically relates to COVID and capacity limits perhaps being changed if an uptick occurs?

A: All the current mitigation measures that are put into place and all the steps we have taken in reopening the economy can be scaled back if our public health measures do so require them to be. We want people to have the freedom of being able to plan their events and performances, but these plans must always have the caveat that there are back-up plans if capacity restrictions are reduced, or more strict mitigation requirements are put into place. We encourage individuals and event organizers to remain flexible. Whatever current capacity restrictions and mitigation measures are in the Executive Order at the time of your event are the ones you should follow and adhere to.

Additional information links and forms:

Fully_Vaccinated_Masking_FAQ.pdf (ri.gov)

The provided guidance is safer to adopt for fully vaccinated individuals. Establishments may (but are not required to) supplement these rules with their own rules regarding mask wearing, proof of vaccination, testing, and other mitigations. Signage guiding expectations around the following topics is recommended at establishments. As of Friday, May 21, the following adaptations, by sector, will be effective:

  • No physical distancing is required
  • Indoor Dining: No restrictions
  • Bar Areas: No restrictions. Indoor standing service allowed; no plexiglass required
  • Catered Events: No restrictions: 100% capacity with no cap; indoor and outdoor standing/bar service/cocktail hours; open dance floors
  • Houses of Worship: No restrictions
  • Retail: No restrictions
  • Gyms, Sports, Recreation: No restrictions
  • Personal Services: No restrictions
  • Venues of Assembly: No restrictions
  •  Funeral Homes: No restrictions
  • Offices: No restrictions
  • Social Gatherings: No restrictions
  • Pools: No restrictions
  • Casinos: No restrictions

Sports: Mask requirements remain in place for all youth sports, indoor and outdoor. The CDC has recommended this through the end of the school year because young people are not fully vaccinated yet. This policy will be reassessed on July 1st. Adult sports will have no restrictions and will follow CDC guidance.

In the following sectors that are considered “higher-risk,” CDC masking guidance for vaccinated individuals is especially important.

  • Live Vocal Performances: Status quo. Can move to no restrictions if vaccination proof is required.
  • Nightclubs: Remain at 50% capacity. Can move to no restrictions if vaccination proof is required.
  • Indoor Hookah: Status quo (not permitted). Permitted and can move to no capacity restrictions if vaccination proof is required.

There are three key sectors that are remaining status quo:

  • Healthcare settings
  • Congregate care settings
  • Youth and school-based events

Reiteration of Masking Recommendations

Q: Who still has to wear a mask and practice social distancing?

  • People who are not fully vaccinated. This includes children from 2 to 12 years of age. Children younger than 12 cannot be vaccinated.
  • Both vaccinated and unvaccinated people in healthcare settings. Examples of healthcare settings include doctors’ offices, home nursing facilities, hospitals, and nursing homes.
  • Both vaccinated and unvaccinated people traveling on public transportation. No capacity restrictions. Other applicable state and federal rules remain in effect.
  • Both vaccinated and unvaccinated people in facilities that serve people experiencing homelessness, including residents and employees.
  • In prisons and correctional facilities.
  • Teachers, students, school administrators, and staff should continue to wear masks while in school and in school-based settings, even if they are fully vaccinated.
  • Both vaccinated and unvaccinated employees and customers of businesses that require masks.
  •  In other states, cities, towns that have different masking rules that differ from Rhode Island’s rules.
  • Masking required for student catered events/strongly recommended for other catered events.

If you have not already done so, you can make an appointment to be vaccinated at www.vaccinateRI.org or by calling 844-930-1779.  You do not need appointments to get vaccinated at the sites at Sockanosset Cross Road (100 Sockanosset Cross Road, Cranston) and the Dunkin’ Donuts Center (1 La Salle Square, Providence). Vaccines are also available at pharmacies throughout Rhode Island.

Businesses looking for more information regarding reopening can visit, reopeningri.com. Print signage resources, reopening guideline charts, and masking guidance are available on this site.

Business owners with specific questions can visit, dbr.ri.gov or call and leave a message on the COVID-19 Hotline at 401-889-5550.

Sign up for our newsletter for the latest information.

May 20, 2021, guidelines override re-opening for the arts FAQs of April 2021

The RI Arts Council hosted a webinar on April 9, 2021, to update the arts community on the latest rules and regulations regarding re-opening for the arts this spring and summer. If you missed it, here is a link to the recording. Below are the questions and answers that were covered in the webinar.

The speakers were:
Department of Health, Steven Boudreau;
Commerce RI Benjamin Mays;
City of Providence, ProvidenceACT: Lizzie Araujo;
and Department of Business Regulation, Elizabeth Tanner.

Outdoor Events

Q: What are current restrictions on outdoor performances? Number of attendees, distancing and masks? How does the size of the space influence any and all of these factors?

A: Outdoor performances are restricted to the same capacity requirements as outdoor venues of assembly which are currently capped at 500 people. Six-foot distancing must always be maintained between people who are not from the same household and masks must always be worn.

Size of the area does not impact the capacity restrictions and 500 people is the maximum any outdoor venue of assembly can go up to. However, with the 6-foot distancing requirement, not all outdoor venues will be able to accommodate 500 people. The 6 foot-distancing requirement takes precedence over the 500-person maximum.

Q: What should we know about performers operating outdoors in front of an audience? Choral and instrumental spacing on stage? Masked or unmasked?

A: While performers are singing or playing an instrument that requires the use of their mouth, modify or adjust seating arrangements and use visual cues to keep them at least 14 feet apart when masks are not being worn.

Performers singing or playing wind instruments with masks on and using bell covers should be a minimum of six feet apart. If performers are masked and playing an instrument that does not require the use of their mouth, such as drums, guitar, violin etc., keep them six feet apart, but 14 feet apart from those who are using their mouths to play an instrument or sing without a mask. This includes specialty music performance masks such as masks with slits, or in outdoor rehearsals where appropriate physical distancing may be challenging or inconsistent, such as marching band.

Limit the sharing of props, costumes, and wigs. Designate personal props to each individual and mark with name tags. No sharing of voice projecting mechanisms such as microphones or headpieces. Even microphones and headpieces used by only one person should be disinfected after use.

Q: Do you have guidance on things like box office operations, food service (for audience and for performers, with masks off)? Organized in pods or general seating?

A: Contactless payment is encouraged. If food or drink is being served, designated areas should be created away from the general audience where patrons are able to remove their masks for eating and drinking purposes. These areas should follow the same restrictions that are placed on the restaurant sector.

Q: What are reopening guidelines for summer 2021 youth camps?

A: They are pending and should be available shortly. Subscribe to our e-newsletter where we will place updates or check back here for updates.

Indoor Events

Q: If we are in compliance with regulations, when will indoor performances be able to resume? What questions should we be considering as we start to think about in-person events once more?

A: Indoor performances can resume following the same restrictions that are placed on venues of assembly.

Q: What are current restrictions on indoor performances or art exhibits? Number of attendees, distancing, masks? How does the size of the space influence any and all of these factors?

A: In both performance venues and art exhibits, 6-foot distancing must always be maintained between people who are not from the same household. Indoor performance venues would be classified as venues of assembly.

Currently venues of assembly are restricted to 50 percent of the venues capacity and capped at 250 indoors and 500 outdoors. With the 6-foot distancing requirement, some venues may not be able to achieve the 50 percent capacity or capped thresholds.

Indoor art exhibits are restricted to one person per 50 square feet.

Q: Are there any differences among the kinds of performances? For example, youth theatre, dance, instrumental or choral music?

A: No

Ventilated/Unventilated spaces

Q: What are HVAC requirements for summer – small spaces with old air conditioning units or are poorly ventilated?

A: Individual venues should consult with the Department of Business Regulations with the specifics of their current HVAC capabilities.

Q: Will performers need to wear masks when they are off stage?

A: Yes, performers must wear masks when they are off stage.

Social distancing

Q: what are some best practices for audiences? If patrons are seated more than six feet apart, is it okay for them to remove masks?

A: No, even if the social distancing requirement is maintained at six feet, masks cannot be removed and must be worn throughout the duration of the event.

People from the same household may sit within 6 feet of one another, but those who are not from the same household must be sat at least 6 feet apart from one another.

Q: What guidelines exist for cleaning and disinfecting?

A: All covered entities shall ensure the performance of environmental cleaning of their establishments once per day, with particular attention paid to commonly touched surfaces, such as shared workstations, elevator buttons, door handles and railings. Covered entities shall use, and have readily available to service providers, cleaning/disinfecting products designed to clean/disinfect the surfaces they are cleaning/disinfecting and shall use the products in the manner intended.

Vaccinated, Tested, Infected

Q: Do you recommend testing prior to rehearsals or performances? Will proof of vaccination replace proof of a negative COVID test result?

A: The Health Department continues to recommend testing even for rehearsals and performances. Currently, proof of vaccination does not replace a negative COVID test.

Q: Are there any guidelines about distancing if all performers have been vaccinated? or if not?

A: The Executive Order currently in place mandates that six feet be maintained from people who are not from the same household regardless of vaccination status. Even those who have been vaccinated, should stay 6 feet apart from those who are not from the same household as them.

Q: If a performer, student or staff member tests positive for COVID, will the program or production need to be shut down for a period of time?

A: Depending on who is identified as a close contact of the person who has tested positive, the program or production may need to suspend operations.

Anyone who was within six feet of the positive individual for a total of 15 minutes or more, starting two days before their symptom onset or before a positive test was received, is identified as a close contact and must follow the quarantine guidelines. Current exemptions from close contact quarantine can be found in Executive Order 21-26.

Q: Can/should a venue collect written vaccination status from performers, staff, volunteers and audience members, and is this even allowable? how does one handle a non-vaccinated person?

A: We are not proposing this at this time.

If things go bad

Q: Can you share some force majeure contract language that specifically relates to COVID and capacity limits perhaps being changed if an uptick occurs?

A: All the current mitigation measures that are put into place and all the steps we have taken in reopening the economy can be scaled back if our public health measures do so require them to be. We want people to have the freedom of being able to plan their events and performances, but these plans must always have the caveat that there are back-up plans if capacity restrictions are reduced, or more strict mitigation requirements are put into place. We encourage individuals and event organizers to remain flexible. Whatever current capacity restrictions and mitigation measures are in the Executive Order at the time of your event are the ones you should follow and adhere to.

Additional information links and forms: