RI Arts and Humanities Councils award nearly $1 million in grants with federal funds to 121 culture, humanities, arts nonprofits

Funding expands assistance reach to state’s more vulnerable and hardest-hit organizations

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is RI-CHARG-MAP-1.jpgSome 121 RI culture, humanities and arts nonprofits benefit from the RI Culture, Humanities and Arts Recovery Grant (RI CHARG) program, a historic collaborative partnership between the State Council on the Arts (RISCA) and the Rhode Island Council for the Humanities (Humanities Council). The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) awarded $968,000 in assistance to Rhode Island from their American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funds and is not part of the $1.1 billion in ARPA funding awarded to the state.

These federally appropriated cultural assistance funds administered by RISCA and the Humanities Council provide general operating support grants of $8,000 each to 121 culture, humanities, and arts nonprofits:

  • 95% are small to midsize and/or Black, Indigenous and People of Color (BIPOC) centered organizations;
  • 65% are organizations based outside the city of Providence; and
  • More than 25% are first-time grantees.

The Councils designed the RI CHARG program to help RI’s culture, humanities, and arts nonprofits prevent, prepare, respond, and recover from hardships suffered due to the pandemic. In keeping with federal agencies’ priority on equity, inclusion, and access efforts and to support small and  mid size organizations, funding priorities were given to BIPOC centered organizations and nonprofits with annual budgets under $500,000.

Click here for a list of grantees. You can also find the listing at the Humanities Council.This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Final-CHARG-logo-v.2-Email-Header--1024x341.jpg

“These federal funds given to our state through the NEA’s and NEH’s ARPA allotments acknowledge the important economic impact culture, humanities, and arts have on Rhode Island,” Governor McKee said. “On behalf of Rhode Island, I thank and applaud our State Council on the Arts and RI’s Humanities Council for their partnership and swift work in getting this badly needed recovery assistance to their respective communities.”

Elizabeth Francis, Executive Director of the Humanities Council noted: “This historic collaboration between the Humanities Council and RISCA has enabled our two organizations to streamline the application process for cultural organizations across the state, ensuring that the combined $968,000 in relief funds from the NEH and NEA reaches those in the prioritized areas. This unique approach has gained national attention and we’re proud to know that culture, humanities, and arts nonprofits across the state will benefit from this effort. As communities emerge from the pandemic, the humanities and arts are essential to rebuilding our social fabric.”

Randall Rosenbaum, Executive Director of RISCA, added: “I am delighted that we were able to combine funding from the NEA and NEH to directly support these cultural nonprofits. We’re proud that so many of these grantees are small and medium sized organizations; represent culturally diverse communities; or are new to us. These grants will have a significant impact on communities throughout our state who have suffered greatly because of the pandemic.”

Public Art Works has a call for submission

Call for Art: Hopehealth Hospice and Palliative Care Rhode Island art gallery exhibition (HHHPC) (rotating)

Application deadline: Jan. 7, 2022, with no application fee and $250 honorarium. Students are ineligible.

Hopehealth Hospice & Palliative Care provides compassionate, professional, state-of-the-art physical, emotional and spiritual care for all people facing life-threatening illness at any stage of life and in any setting they choose.

The Art Selection Committee is seeking 2D visual artists (no sculpture or wall reliefs) for solo exhibitions on the first floor designated, “The Gallery” of the hopehealth Hospice & Palliative Care (HHHPC) facility located at 1085 North Main Street, Providence, Rhode Island. The Gallery is in an area of high foot traffic and viewed by everyone who visits HHHPC. Artwork will be installed by the staff of HHHPC and a representative of Public Art Works.

Click here to learn more.

Arts State Council adds 11 RI teaching artists to its Teaching Artist Roster

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is creative-ground-logo.pngTo dovetail with National Arts in Education Week, Sept. 12 – 18, the Rhode Island State Council on the Arts (RISCA) proudly announces additions to its Rhode Island Teaching Artist Roster. The Roster is a list of teaching artists and arts organizations who have been reviewed by public panels and selected based on their mastery of an artistic discipline, experience and training to work in educational settings.

The Roster is widely used as a public resource by education sites and individuals looking to engage an artist for an arts learning residency or project. The eleven additions reside in the following city or town: Bristol, Middletown, North Kingstown, North Providence, Pawtucket, Providence and Warwick.

“We are pleased to announce these eleven additions—all of whom are incredibly talented and a resource to punctuate the message that the arts are an essential part of every student’s education, particularly during a pandemic, when so much else has been changed or lost. These new teaching artists exemplify National Arts in Education Week, which celebrates the arts in education and honors arts educators.”

Randall Rosenbaum, Executive Director of RISCA

RISCA’s Roster is housed on the New England Foundation of the Arts’ CreativeGround website. To see the entire Roster, click here.

The new additions are:

  • Stephan Brigidi, Bristol, photography: “Through my travels I have come to observe the greater diversity of people, and my interests are in addressing our linkage in humanity. …By my image-making, I want to explore our common bonds and express my strong beliefs in the importance of this.”
  • Joy Prentice, Middletown, dance: “Movement helps move the mind. One of my guiding values is integrity through grace. To that end, I devote my creative time to inspiring students to healthy living, mental and physical flexibility and equity awareness.”
  • Cindy Wilson, North Kingstown, photography: “Discovering the unique; finding the extraordinary in the mundane; honoring the forgotten; and recording the soon to change are the fuel of my journey.”
  • Everett Hoag, North Providence, multidisciplinary theatre, fiber arts and design: “Through color, form, language, sound and movement, skilled artisans help interpret our past, understand the present, and envision our future. Our work breaks down barriers and helps us appreciate what it means to be human.”
  • Ricky Katowicz, North Providence, multidisciplinary visual arts, crafts and performance art: “While creating, I find myself to be acting in one (1) of three (3) states of being at all times: 1.) playing 2.) floating 3.) focusing. These actions can take on many different forms, such as: dancing, sound making, singing, walking, cooking or washing dishes.”
  • MacKenzie Kugel, Pawtucket, music and theatre: “My love for teaching is rooted in my commitment to community-building; this was solidified three years ago teaching in Sri Lanka at an organization facilitating healing through music. … My devised theater pedagogy prioritizes art-making that is fundamentally inclusive and grounded in cultivating community.”
  • Damont Combs, Providence, multidisciplinary poet: “I teach youth life lessons through poetry. This helps them inside the classroom and outside the classroom by building skills such as confidence, the ability to speak up, researching topics of interest, dedication, and to overcome certain fears.”
  • Ravi Shankar, Providence, interdisciplinary theatre: “As a writer of color, diversity, inclusion and cultural responsiveness are key components of my work, and I believe that everyone has a story to tell, which can be healing and revelatory.”
  • Chris Monti, Providence, music and healing arts: “My goal is to keep new music and influences coming in, to let those influences simmer in their own time and emerge in original compositions and performances, and to foster connections with audiences and students.
  • Seth McCombs, Warwick, visual arts, media arts and literature: “I work to create a vision of Rhode Island as a magical place in which all children can see themselves. I mine local history and folklore and weave imaginary elements through these stories to lift them from fact to myth.”
  • Christine Kellerman, Moonstone Art Studio, Warwick, visual arts: “Enjoying the sensory, hands-on process of art making is just as, if not more important than, a ‘perfect’ finished piece.”